Tag: asia

Report

Down to the bone: China’s alarming trade in leopard bones

Leopards are Asia's most traded big cat, with more than 4,900 seized from illegal trade in Asia since 2000, new evidence indicates the Government of China is issuing permits to trade and use their bones. The trade in leopard bones is primarily to meet demand from Chinese consumers; used in similar ways to tiger bone

Report

In Our Palms

To meet its pledge to halt deforestation, the European Union needs to act to reduce the deforestation footprint of the commodities it imports, including palm oil. Existing methods to alleviate the impacts of palm oil, have failed to stop deforestation sufficiently to qualify as ‘sustainability’

Report

A Tale of Two Laws

The US Lacey Act and The European Union Timber Regulation (EUTR). In this briefing, we explore the previously unrealised fact that both laws can work together, with the Lacey Act prohibiting timber sold in violation of the EUTR, as a ’foreign law‘

Report

Cultivating Demand – The Growing Threat of Tiger Farms

Asia’s big cats continue to be threatened by a growing, unchallenged demand for their body parts. There are fewer than 4,000 wild tigers and anywhere between 3,920-6,390 snow leopards, while leopards remain one of the most traded of Asia’s big cats. Since 2000, the parts of over 1,700 tigers have been seized

Report

EIA Briefing Document on CITES National Ivory Action Plans (NIAPs)

Assessing progress made by NIAP countries, China, Kenya, Laos, Mozambique and Vietnam, selected for the important role they play in the ivory trade. We urge CITES Parties to employ International Consortium on Combating Wildlife Crime indicators to evaluate the impact of their governments’ responses to wildlife crime

Front cover of our report entitled The Lion's Share: South Africa's trade exacerbates demand for tiger parts and derivatives
Report

The Lion’s Share

The major threat to the world’s remaining wild tigers is poaching to meet the high demand in Asia for their parts and derivatives. This demand is exacerbated by the legal trade in lion bone so long as they were sourced from captive-breeding facilities in South Africa